6 Best Solid State Amp for Clean Sound in 2022

Best Solid State Amp for Clean Sound

Although best solid state amp for clean sound have been around since the early 1960s, vacuum tubes, instead of transistors, produced the majority of the most excellent electric guitar tones ever. For a long time, solid-state technology seemed impossible to achieve the flattering compression, clipping, saturation, and non-linear response of valve amps that most guitarists adore. Best solid state amp for clean sound were mainly restricted to bedrooms of amateurs during the 1980s and 1990s, with the Roland Jazz Chorus and a few other notable exceptions. Even the space-station-sized digital racks of stadium guitarists had valve preamps and power amps at their foundation.

Digital modeling has revolutionized everything during the past two decades. Digital modeling technology is now so convincing when connected to a solid-state preamp that it can be difficult for even the most discriminating listener to tell the difference between the modeled sound and the “real thing,”, especially in the context of a band mix. Even while tube tone and feel are unsurpassed, now is the ideal time to switch to a guitar amplifier with a solid-state or digital design.

What is better, solid-state or tube?

What’s not to like about solid-state amplifiers? They are lighter, cheaper, and don’t require tube changes. It’s not relatively that easy, though. Valve failure is inevitable, but valves are simple to replace, and tube circuits are typically far simpler for amp technicians to repair than contemporary digital ones. A 1955 tube amplifier that has been well-maintained will continue to perform admirably onstage and in the studio for many years. On the other side, how is your 2010 smartphone holding up? You see, we warned you that it wasn’t that easy.

Despite this, many new generations of digital modeling amplifiers offer a stunning and endlessly inspiring variety of tones and effects to play with, exchanging tones with other users and downloading profiles of vintage tube amps that are far beyond the means of ordinary people. And loudness can be found in even low-power valve amps. The preferred digital systems for touring professionals are Kemper and Axe-Fx. However, today, you don’t need to pay a fortune to sound fantastic, so let us be your guide.

What should you consider while purchasing a solid-state amplifier?

Before you read through our list, consider what you need from a guitar amplifier. Impulse responses, amp modeling, hybrid designs—there are many technical languages to decipher. Although digital and solid-state amplifiers don’t need to be driven aggressively to sound friendly, valve amplifiers have a far higher perceived volume. A 20-watt modeling amp most likely won’t be heard above your drummer; however, a 20-watt valve combination will work just fine as a gigging amp. For instance, the Tone Master Deluxe Reverb from Fender uses a 100-watt solid-state power amp to simulate a 22-watt tube amplifier’s output.

The user experience comes next. Do you want your digital amplifier to have just a small number of controls and the appearance and feel of a vintage valve amp? Or do you like to launch an app for deep editing over Bluetooth or traverse menu after menu on an LCD screen? The list that follows includes all of these choices in addition to others. It’s time to start.

Comparison Table:

Last update on 2022-09-30 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Roland JC-120 Jazz Chorus 120 Watt Guitar Amplifier

Roland JC-120 Jazz Chorus 120 Watt Guitar Amplifier

A Roland JC-120 Jazz Chorus 120 Watt Guitar Amplifier is in use at this time. As one of the most renowned non-tube jazz amplifiers on the market and one of the few early solid-state amplifiers to have a faithful cult following, we are starting with a big boy in the jazz world. For its day, the Roland JC-120 was genuinely revolutionary. It was the first solid-state amplifier with an internal analog chorus when it hit the market in 1975. During its early development stages, Roland incorporated a stereo effects loop, which was well-received by both experts and beginners.

The two 60-watt power amps, which power a pair of 12-inch speakers capable of creating a variety of high-quality tones, haven’t altered since the amplifiers were first installed. Reverb, vibrato, and distortion are among the effects added, in addition to the analog chorus that was previously described. Here, a two-channel system is used, one for clean sound and the other for effects.

PROS

  • Guitar greats frequently use this iconic sound.
  • Very adaptable.
  • The industry’s top, built-in chorus.
  • She was known for her lucid clarity.

CONS

  • Although you can always use a pedal, the distortion is flat and lifeless. The clean sound is fantastic, but the distorted sound is ordinary.
  • It can occasionally produce an audible hiss, especially when using numerous pedals. To solve this issue, a noise gate might be included.
  • Costly, but the quality is usually expensive.

Roland Guitar Combo Amplifier, 49 Keys (BC-HOT)

Roland Guitar Combo Amplifier, 49 Keys (BC-HOT)

Another Roland, but this one is a much more delicate creature. A 30-watt blues modeling amplifier, the Roland Guitar Combo Amplifier, 49 Keys (BC-HOT) is also referred to as the Roland Blues Cube. There is a good reason why the Cube series has been around for so long. This range of amplifiers has a reputation for excellent pricing, quality, and dependability, packed into a small, lightweight design. This single 30-watt power amp connects to a 12-inch speaker and has compact dimensions of 17.0 x 9.4 x 16.3′′ (433 x 239.0 x 413 mm) and a lightweight design of 27.78 lb (12.6 kg).

To imitate the inner workings of the amplifier itself, Roland uses their patented Tube Logic system, which they say “not only emulates the sound of a tube amplifier’s output.” It is an excellent small all-arounder that won’t break the money, and while testing, we discovered that it is mighty with a decent variety of modeling possibilities. Regarding fame, Robert Smith performs live with a stereo pair of this amp’s larger 80-watt brethren.

PROS

  • The choice of power output performs amazingly well.
  • friendly to users
  • Cost-effective.
  • Excellent for traveling musicians.

CONS

  • Although this is typical of most modeling amps, we didn’t particularly like some modeling settings.
  • The style isn’t something we particularly like, but that’s entirely up to you.

Fender Mustang I V2 20-Watt 1×8-Inch Combo Electric Guitar Amplifier.

Fender Mustang I V2 20-Watt 1×8-Inch Combo Electric Guitar Amplifier.

\With only 20 watts of power, this Fender modeling amp might pass you by if you weren’t looking. Hold on, though, and you might want to reconsider after hearing about the Fender Mustang I V2 20-Watt 1/8-Inch Combo Electric Guitar Amplifier! This amplifier is an excellent addition to any amplifier collection. Thanks to its effortless connection to either PC or Mac computers (through the Fender Fuse app), it can serve as your primary amplifier.

With this fantastic software Fender adopted for all of their solid-state amps, you have a tonne of flexibility over the settings, making tone modification simple as pie. Additionally, there is a sizable library of presets created by other users, including well-known guitarists.

PROS

  • Robust design.
  • extremely compact
  • Excellent amp for a novice or as an addition when you want more variation.
  • Compatible with Fender Fuse.

CONS

  • Didn’t do well with high gain.
  • Some of the models had poor audio quality.

Boss KTN-50 12 Inch Katana 50W Combo Guitar Amplifier

Boss KTN-50 12 Inch Katana 50W Combo Guitar Amplifier

Next on our list is the Boss KTN-50 12 Inch Katana 50W Combo Guitar Amplifier. The clean, crunch, brown, lead, and acoustic amp characteristics are included in this stage-ready, acoustic/electric modeling combination amp. Before purchasing this one, we read some reviews, and the agonizing delivery delay was caused by our excitement to try it out.

Looking down, we can find controls for the amp type, gain, and volume at the top, followed by the bass, mid, and treble settings. The tone setting part, which includes the master volume control, power level, and power on/off switch, is the last section before the three effects knobs, including the reverb, are available. The power level setting control on this device is excellent and greatly aids in maintaining silence on stage or in the studio.

PROS

  • The sleek design combines traditional and contemporary design principles.
  • BOSS tone studio accessibility.
  • A wonderful blend of simplicity and individuality.

CONS

  • Nothing obvious.

Marshall Amps Code 25 Amplifier Part (CODE25)

Marshall Amps Code 25 Amplifier Part (CODE25)

Is Marshall a producer of guitar amps that is more recognizable? No, we believe. Since the 1960s, images of the massive Marshall stacks have caught the attention of budding guitarists worldwide. Each Marshall amp’s front is decorated with its timeless, flowing white emblem, and the control panel and knobs are inlaid with gold to match. Marshall has always created amplifiers that look fantastic and sound even better. This is true of the Marshall Amps Code 25 Amplifier Part (CODE25),15′′ x 10′′ x 15′′, Black as well.

The Marshall Gateway app’s control and preset editing features are also included as standard (available on both IOS and Android). We evaluated several different connectivity solutions for this rundown, and this one was, in our opinion, the finest.

PROS

  • The Gateway app functions flawlessly.
  • Most of the modeling presets sounded fantastic, though not all were flawless.
  • In our opinion, the best-looking item on this list is lightweight and portable.

CONS

  • The inability to quickly share your recordings and presets with other users is the sole downside of the Gateway app.

Fender Champion 100 – 100-Watt Electric Guitar Amplifier

Fender Champion 100 – 100-Watt Electric Guitar Amplifier

It will be difficult for you to surpass the absolute workhorse that is the Fender Champion 100 – 100-Watt Electric Guitar Amplifier if you’re searching for value in terms of wattage-to-price ratio. The Fender Champion 100 is probably somewhere in the back or current catalog of amps for most guitarists worth their salt. One of the most trusted solid-state modeled amplifiers is now on the market.

Specifications include a single 100-watt solid-state power amp, two 12″ speakers, a three-band EQ, all the inputs and outputs typical for an amp of this size, and an included footswitch! Reverb, chorus, tremolo, delay, and other effects are available. With a push of a button, the delay time and tremolo tempo may be changed, and there is an effects loop for use with external effects.

PROS

  • Best value for the money.
  • numerous opportunities for customization
  • We discovered that using tap tempo for effects was exceptionally helpful.

CONS

  • It takes time for a speaker to sound their most pleasing.

Conclusion

Many guitarists still favor traditional tube amps despite the best solid state amp for clean sound’ clear benefits. We believe that the reputation for poor performance that solid state amps once had is long gone, and we hope this roundup has eased some of your lingering questions about digital solid state amps!

And with every new model, the pricing, tonal consistency, built-in modeling and effects, and mobility improve. We can’t wait to see where this technology goes in the coming years! Although choosing an amplifier is highly personal, we recommend some of our favorites.

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