6 Best Beat Machine for Beginners in 2022

Best Beat Machine for Beginners

Since a general revival of electronics has led to falling prices, best beat machine for beginners have become almost as affordable as software plugins. This is because electronic music production hardware has made a comeback. A hardware drum machine also offers a tactile approach to music production, similar to synthesizers. Yes, you can make beats in software, but it’s much better to hit pads, punch beats into a sequencer, and tweak the sound with a hands-on controller.

From live performances to adding analog clout to a computer-based mix, drum machines are in demand—each drum machine in our round-up works independently without any additional equipment. Various beat makers provide reliable, workhorse sounds for various genres, up to full-featured groove boxes that add a bass, lead, and sample parts to those beats.

Choosing the best beat machine for beginners 

It is always important to consider price when choosing a best beat machine for beginners, but it should not be the only one. The sound you are after should also be a top priority as this can vary enormously between models, from proper analog synth circuitry to generate drum tones, to a more flexible combination of both analog synthesis and digital samples, to customizable models that you can load into your samples using an S.D. card. Aside from portability, it would help if you decided whether you prefer a heavier, more static model that will remain in your studio or one that is portable. 

Other factors worth considering include…

  • Audio outputs: Depending on your drum machine, you may have to process individual drum sounds through a mixing desk or multi-channel audio interface. Ideally, each sound should be sent to its channel and treated with its effects. You can get by with a unit with only single stereo output. As a result, you will need a workaround, perhaps making multiple passes with individual sounds run in isolation and solo, transferring them one by one to the DAW.
  • Performance workflow: When performing with a drum machine on stage, you’ll want it to have an easy-to-use interface and workflow. To navigate and perform effectively, you’ll need decent-sized pads rather than fiddly buttons, so you won’t want to do a lot of menu diving. If you want your machine to handle complete song duties while you play over the top or create different patterns while playing live, chaining individual patterns together is essential.
  • MIDI / Sync: The focus here is on standalone machines, but any connectivity will be helpful at some point – you will have to integrate your beats with other hardware and your DAW. So make sure your machine has MIDI and can sync with an external clock source.

Comparison Table:

Last update on 2022-09-30 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Teenage Engineering PO-32

Teenage Engineering PO-32

Teenage Engineering’s Pocket Operators are fun and surprisingly flexible sound makers with a look more akin to calculators than drum machines. There are three drum/percussion products in the range: the PO-12 rhythm, the PO-24 office, which deals with noise percussion, and the PO-32 tonic. There are other models, such as the PO-33 K.O.! You can add your custom beats to PO-133 Street Fighter and PO-134 Street Fighter.

Sonic Charge’s MicroTonic drum synth plugin can be imported into this model, allowing users to alter and overwrite its sounds completely. You can create an entire song with the onboard 64 patterns and pattern chaining and sync the Pocket Operators to each other and other gear. Despite their fiddliness, these machines are great fun, sound great, and are affordable.

Pros:

  • Compact and ultra-portable
  • Value for money is excellent.
  • It can be combined with other Pocket Operators.

Cons:

  • There is not much connectivity

Korg Volca Sample 2

Korg Volca Sample 2

Korg’s Volca range took a sharp turn in 2014 with the launch of the Volca Sample. This demonstrates sites that the ‘people’s synth’ range could be more than just analog revivalist instruments.However, our initial review of the sampler highlighted a few niggles, one of which was its lack of digital connectivity.Korg took steps to the right this wrong by updating the sampler with a micro USB port, increasing memory, and improving sequencer and MIDI capabilities.With the original’s over-reliance on iOS connectivity, the USB port is the most welcome addition. The increased memory is also enviously viewed by users of the original, which has 200 slots, double that of the original.

Pros:

  • Sample upload is much easier with USB input
  • Chaining patterns adds flexibility
  • Compared to version 1, this version has more sounds and memory.

Cons:

  • There is no USB cable included

Korg Volca Drum

Korg Volca Drum

As opposed to Volca Beats and Kick, which condensed analog drum synths into compact hardware formats (and Volca Samples allows you to add your beats), the Drum uses digital synthesis to create a percussive palette that is broader and weirder than its predecessors.To create its percussive sounds, the Volca Drum uses a system of virtual analog oscillators, modulators, and resonators rather than PCM samples. There are six parts to the sound engine, each with two identical layers. This multilayer engine is considerably more profound and exciting than we’ve seen before on a Volca beatmaker. Still, it’s just nice to have a drum machine that extends beyond aping the same old ’80s drum machines. You should try this if you are a dance music producer.

Pros:

  • Low-cost multilayer drum engine
  • Resonator effect of Ace Wave Guide
  • Percussive palette unique to the genre

Cons:

  • It’s a bit restrictive to have only one audio output

Korg Volca Beats

Korg Volca Beats

With an analog and PCM sound engine, the Volca Beats also offers digital control, so knob tweaks and note info can be recorded into the built-in sequencer. In Volca Beats, there are six analog sounds (kicks, snares, hi-hats, and toms) and four PCM sounds (claves, agogo, clap, and crash cymbal). Kicks can be clicky or deep, hats cut well, and snares have a woody tone that can be further enhanced by layering PCM claps or increasing snap. As with other Volcas, connectivity options are somewhat limited, but the Volca Beats is about fun, and that’s what you’ll get. Look no further if you want analog drum sounds on a budget.

Pros:

  • Portability is excellent
  • Sturdy yet lightweight
  • A quality sound for a small investment

Cons:

  • Connectivity options are limited.

IK Multimedia UNO Drum

IK Multimedia UNO Drum

A hybrid analog/sample playback machine with a powerful synth engine housed in a lightweight plastic enclosure, UNO Drum represents I.K. Multimedia’s first foray into analog gear. It feels fragile and strangely heated, which makes it difficult to see how it will withstand the regular battering.Its six analog kick, snare clap, and hi-hat sounds are authentically warm, rich-sounding, and paired with 54 PCM sounds from I.K.’s SampleTank sample library. The UNO Drum is an excellent kit with 100 preset kits, a powerful sequencer with 100 pattern memory, and some neat touches like Stutter and Roll buttons for polishing your patterns.

Pros:

  • Value for money
  • A portable and easy-to-use device

Cons:

  • Build quality is slightly below par
  • Pads are more responsive than buttons

Arturia DrumBrute Impact

Arturia DrumBrute Impact

The DrumBrute Impact combines a sequencer with an all-analog drum synthesis engine and a flexible pattern saving/song mode. The Impact looks similar to its predecessor, housed in a solid, navy blue chassis similar to the rest of Arturia’s ‘Brute’ series. Though the Impact has fewer instruments than the DrumBrute (17 instead of 17), it is not simply a smaller version of the giant machine. Here, much of the sound engine has been overhauled, and the DrumBrute’s Parker and Steiner filters have been replaced with beefier distortion effects. The sequencer’s Roller and Beat Repeat tools are a couple of handy options for spicing up fills and turnarounds.

 Featuring 64 pattern slots, there is plenty of space to save and recall grooves, and the Song mode makes it easy to stitch together full arrangements. While the Impact lacks a little sonic flexibility, it’s an inspiring and enticing drum machine at an excellent price.

Pros:

  • A killer sequencer and quality drum sounds
  • Diffuse analog distortion
  • Useful color parameter

Cons:

  • The sound isn’t the most versatile.

FAQs

SYNTHPOP ARTISTS USE WHAT KIND OF BEAT MACHINES?

Hip-hop and synthpop share more in common than you might think since the Roland TR-808 has been a popular choice for both genres for decades. Another big drum machine in the 1980s was the Oberheim DMX drum machine, used on New Order’s “Blue Monday.”On their classic album Violator, Depeche Mode used the Boss DR-55 drum machine.Some of the most popular 1980s drum machines include the LinnDrum and samplers with drum sounds, such as the Fairlight CMI. Even nowadays, many synthpop artists rely heavily on 1980s drum machines.

Is a drum machine required to have sticks?

Some drum machines can be routed to electronic drum pads that can be hit with drum sticks, just like a genuine drum kit. You can buy an electronic drum kit if you want a more realistic feel.You can, however, play drum machines with your fingers like a keyboard without sticks.

WHAT IS THE METHOD BY WHICH A DRUM MACHINE MAKES SOUNDS?

Some drum machines use synthesis to produce their sounds by combining waveforms of different shapes. As such, you can use a synthesizer to make drum sounds, but the difference is that with a drum machine, you can play those sounds across pads rather than keys.In 1980, the Linn LM-1 was the first drum machine to use sampled sounds of real drums.

Conclusion

 The Roland TR-808 drum machine failed when it was first released in 1980. Many people thought the best beat machine for beginners sounded unrealistic and flat since they were created through analog synthesis, especially since the Linn LM-1 drum machine came out around the same time.Hip-hop and electronic dance music, such as house and techno, became synonymous with the 808 kick drum.As everyone used it, from Prince to Public Enemy to Phil Collins, more people became familiar with it. Aside from revolutionizing electronic music’s sounds, the 808 also changed how people perceive pop music and how popular songs are written.Today, with electronic music as big as ever, people have become accustomed to repetitive looped beats rather than traditional song structures.

Related Article:

Best Guitar Tuner

5 Best Bookshelf Speakers for Classical Music 

What is the Difference Between A and F Style Mandolin

Why Do Mandolins Have Double Strings?

Can You Use a Guitar Tuned To Tune a Mandolin?